Jitjatjo Raises $11 million to Match Service and Hospitality Businesses with Temp Workers

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It’s not easy finding quality workers in a pinch, particularly if you’re in the service and hospitality industry. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports an annualized hotel and motel employee turnover rate of 73.8 percent, and food service isn’t faring much better — the National Restaurant Association puts it at 72.9 percent. Unsurprisingly, there’s a labor shortage: The American Hotel and Lodging Association estimates that, as of last month, there were roughly 900,000 job openings in hotels alone. Read more…

American Restaurants Are Finally Embracing Tinned Seafood

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Sardines in olive oil, mackerel in broth, and mussels escabeche (or mussels poached in vinaigrette) packed in colorful tins are more than the perfect souvenir from a Portugal vacation. Globally, preserved fish is on the up and up. According to Bloomberg, the market for tinned fish is expected to reach $36.7 billion by 2021. Although seafood conserva is admittedly more popular in Europe and Asia, the United States is slowly catching on to the notion that tuna isn’t the only worthwhile fish in a can, and here, restaurants are leading the way. Read more…

The 5 Best Ways to Welcome Spring in NYC This Week

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March 20th marks the Vernal Equinox, when the sun is at the equator and night and day are of equal length. Heralded by the earliest astronomers as the first sign of spring -- in fact, many ancient structures such as Stonehenge are monuments to these celestial events -- the Equinox is equally as exciting in a (slowly) thawing New York City. Even though it’s not quite time to break out the short-shorts and sundresses, I’ve rounded up the five best ways to welcome the coming spring in NYC this week. Is it just me, or is our collective seasonal depression starting to lift? Read more…

All the Restaurant Specialty Nights Worth Checking Out Right Now

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When chefs get tired of cooking the same old thing, there’s two options: Create new dishes or cook something entirely different. Recently, there’s been an uptick in specialty nights at notable restaurants throughout the city, including a classic Sunday roast-chicken dinner at Flora Bar on the Upper East Side; a weekly meal at Sunday in Brooklyn, dedicated to old-school Italian fare; and a weekly Japanese curry night at Williamsburg favorite Marlow & Sons, an ode to chef Patch Troffer’s Japanese heritage and a new direction for the restaurant’s menu. “I like the process of just making the curry or any long process food that’s really warming and soulful,” Troffer says. “People are really open and excited about it, and for some of them, it’s their first time trying this food.” Here are all the specialty nights worth checking out at New York City restaurants right now. Read more…

José Andrés Has Never Opened a Restaurant in New York. Now He’ll Open 15, All at Once.

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Mercado Little Spain, which will start opening in stages on March 15, as part of the massive Hudson Yards real-estate fantasia, is like someone took all of Spain, and distilled its essence, and then placed that hyper-concentrated version of the country on the far West Side of Manhattan. It is super-Spain. Hyper-Spain. An entire study-abroad semester condensed into 35,000 square feet. Read more…

The 13 NYC Restaurants Working to Fight Hunger

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Each spring the Food Bank for New York City holds a weeklong restaurant campaign that allows local restaurants and its patrons to get involved in the fight against hunger. Eater is excited to partner with the Food Bank and its efforts in this year’s campaign: Eat for Good — running from March 18 to March 24. During the weeklong campaign, restaurants participating in Eat for Good will donate 5 percent of sales to the Food Bank’s mission. On this map are some Eater-approved places to visit all week long. If you’re a restaurant owner and would like to get involved in this year’s campaign, there’s still time to sign up. Read more…

In the Restaurant Industry, Improving Mental Health Feels More Important Than Ever

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The food world suffered a major shock in 2018 when celebrity chef, writer, and television host Anthony Bourdain died by suicide. A cynical yet compassionate realist, Bourdain was often candid about his bouts with depression and substance abuse, and that fact made him more relatable to many of his fans and admirers. Despite his candor, however, many were left shocked and distraught by the news of Bourdain’s passing, including Patrick Mulvaney, owner of the exalted Mulvaney’s B&L in Sacramento, California. But in Mulvaney’s case, the grief he felt was compounded by what was happening locally. Read more…

New York’s Most Underrated Restaurants, According to 14 Chefs

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New York is home to 24,000 restaurants — and chances are good you’re tired of hearing about the same ones, over and over and over. But what about those under-the-radar gems that, for whatever reason, don’t get the love they deserve? Grub Street asked chefs from around the city about the restaurants they feel are some of New York’s best kept secrets. Here are New York City’s most underrated restaurants, according to chefs. Read more…

NYC's Best Female-Led Restaurants Celebrated On International Women's Day

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More than a dozen restaurants are being celebrated as among the best women-led eateries in New York City on International Women's Day. Online reservation site OpenTable teamed up with the James Beard Foundation to highlight notable females in leadership positions at city restaurants, including head chefs, owners and corporate leaders. Their list of 17 eateries features an eclectic mix of flavors and locations, from authentic Japanese cuisine to gourmet mac and cheese, from Harlem to Prospect Heights. Read More…

How Do Nonalcoholic Bars Actually Work?

How Do Nonalcoholic Bars Actually Work?

From a business owner’s standpoint, alcohol-free bars might have better margins, if they’re successful in convincing their customers to shell out the money for craftsmanship. Nonalcoholic bars don’t have to pay liquor license fees or apply for intensive liquor license applications: In New York state, for example, a two-year Alcohol Beverage Control license costs a bar owner around $4,500. Read more…